Cost

The total capital cost of the Seattle MMDI emergency operations centers project including equipment and planning/development costs were $151,700; O&M costs were approximately 5% of the equipment costs.

From the Seattle MMDI Evaluation Report: Appendix A.11, Emergency Operations Centers


30 May 2000
Seattle,Washington,United States


Summary Information

The lack of integrated communication links between Seattle area emergency operations centers (EOCs) was discussed at a series of workshops and meetings during the Seattle MMDI project deployment. As a result of these discussions, radios that operate on the same frequencies were purchased under the Seattle Smart Trek project and initiated the first step toward effective, cooperative emergency communications in the region. The total capital cost for the project including equipment and planning/development costs were $151,700. A total of 16 radios were purchased. Four for the Northwest Region EOCs: King County, Snohomish County, Seattle, and Bellevue. Four for San Juan, Island, Whatcom, and Skagit Counties; however, repeater sites needed upgrading before radio installation. Eight radios were purchased for the Olympic region counties along with 3 repeater stations to handle the additional radio traffic. The Lifeline Route Plan ties all state, county, and local plans for clearing routes, to hospitals, for example, for the first 72 hours after a disaster. Maintenance costs for the communication system are approximately 5% of the radio and repeater equipment costs ($2,860). All costs are constant 1998 dollars.

Equipment DescriptionNon-Recurring CostsRecurring Costs
800 MHz Two-way Radios (Quantity: 16)
$27,200
 
Repeater station upgrades (Quantity: 3)
$30,000
 
Misc. Equipment
$16,000
 
Consulting Fees
$30,000
 
Lifeline Route Plan Data Collection/GIS
$35,000
 
IBI Emergency Management Scope Development
$13,500
 
Communications System Maintenance (5% of Capital Cost)
 
$2,860
TOTAL
$151,700
$2,860




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Source

Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Evaluation Report

Author: Jensen, M., et al. (SAIC, Battelle, Mitretek, and Volpe)

Published By: Federal Highway Administration, U.S. DOT

Prepared by SAIC for the U.S. DOT

Source Date: 30 May 2000

EDL Number: 13071

Other Reference Number: Report No. FHWA-OP-00-019

URL: http://ntl.bts.gov/lib/jpodocs/repts_te/13071.pdf

System Cost

Capital Cost: $151,700 (1998).

O&M cost: $2,860 (1998).

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Costs From This Source

An advanced parking information system was deployed as part of the Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative for $925,000; maintenance costs of the system hardware were estimated at 7% of the hardware capital costs.

Bus tracking capability was added to the Metro Online Web site as part of the Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative at a cost of $333,000.

Nineteen metropolitan North Seattle, Washington city signal systems were integrated at a cost of $1,755,000.

Software development was the key cost driver for the bus arrival and departure information system deployed as part of the Seattle Metropolitan Model Deployment Initiative.

The total capital cost of the Seattle MMDI emergency operations centers project including equipment and planning/development costs were $151,700; O&M costs were approximately 5% of the equipment costs.

Benefits From This Source

A model determined that incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington could decrease the number of stops by 5.6 percent.

A model found that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington would help reduce the number of expected crashes by 2.5 percent and the frequency of fatal crashes by 1.1 percent.

Modeling indicated that coordinating fixed signal timing plans along congested arterial corridors leading into Seattle, Washington, and incorporating arterial traffic flow data into the traveler information system would reduce vehicle delay by 7 percent and 1.8 percent, respectively.

Simulation results indicated that vehicle emissions could be reduced by two percent if arterial traffic flow data were included in the traveler information system in Seattle, Washington.

Users of the Advanced Traveler Information System in Seattle, Washington were satisfied with the information on freeway and transit conditions provided via Web sites and a Traffic TV service.

Lessons From This Source

Develop long-range plans to ensure the success and continuity of advanced traveler information systems.

Involve the private sector in the implementation of multiple advanced traveler information technologies.

Use an appropriate procurement mechanism to support the implementation of multiple advanced traveler information technologies.

Cost ID: 2003-00034